Following up on his earlier statement about the impact of the Supreme Court’s decision in NLRB v. Noel Canning on Richard Cordray’s actions taken prior to his July 16, 2013 confirmation by the Senate as CFPB Director, Republican Congressman Jeb Hensarling has sent a letter to Mr. Cordray in which he asserts that the decision

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed today to review the D.C. Circuit’s decision in Noel Canning v. NLRB invalidating President Obama’s January 4, 2012 appointment of three NLRB members.  Because Richard Cordray was appointed CFPB Director on the same day and through the same assertion of “recess” appointment authority as the NLRB members at issue in

The briefing on the NLRB’s petition for certiorari in Noel Canning was completed yesterday, with the filing by the NLRB of a brief replying to the respondent’s brief filed on May 23.

The entry “DISTRIBUTED for Conference of June 20, 2013” now appears on the Supreme Court’s docket.  (The court’s standard procedure is to

We have been following very closely developments in NLRB v. Noel Canning, the case seeking Supreme Court review of the D.C. Circuit Court’s judgment invalidating President Obama’s January 4, 2012 appointment of several NLRB members. This case will likely determine the fate of Richard Cordray, who was appointed as Director of the CFPB on

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and his 44 Senate Republican colleagues have filed an amicus brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to grant certiorari in NLRB v. Noel Canning. Indicating that the Republican Senators have “an unparalleled interest in safeguarding the chamber’s constitutionally prescribed role in the appointments process, which the Executive here sought

We recently reported that counsel for the respondent in NLRB v. Noel Canning planned to make a filing advising the U.S. Supreme Court that the respondent did not oppose the NLRB’s petition for certiorari

That filing occurred on May 23, with respondent filing a brief stating that it “does not oppose certiorari because this

The dark cloud that has been hanging over CFPB Director Richard Cordray’s recess appointment just got darker.  In a 2-1 decision in NLRB v. New Vista Nursing and Rehabilitation, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled today that, under the U.S. Constitution’s Recess Appointments Clause (RAC), the President may only make

“Can we duck the [recess appointments] issue?”  That question was asked yesterday by one of the members of the Third Circuit three-judge panel hearing oral argument on the National Labor Relation Board’s application to enforce its order in NLRB v. New Vista Nursing.
New Vista, like the Noel Canning v. NLRB case decided

Much attention has been devoted to what the D.C. Circuit’s Canning decision could mean for the CFPB’s rulemaking, supervisory and enforcement authority.  Now, a Congressman is questioning the decision’s implications for the CFPB’s funding from the Fed.  

In a letter to Fed Chair Ben Bernake dated March 8, Republican Congressman Jeb Hensarling, who chairs the