Litigation and Court Decisions

In a thoughtful opinion that diverges from how other circuit courts have addressed the issue, the Second Circuit recently issued a ruling clarifying the circumstances when data breach plaintiffs can rely on fear of identity theft to establish Article III standing.

The case is McMorris v. Carlos Lopez & Associates, LLP (CLA).  CLA offers mental

The ruling that a debt collector’s transmittal of debt information to its letter vendor could violate the FDCPA’s limits on third party communications has produced shock waves.  After reviewing the court’s FDCPA analysis, we discuss the decision’s potential application to a range of third party service providers and to first-party creditors and the prospects for

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit filed by the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS) in D.C. federal district court seeking to block the OCC from granting a national bank charter to Figure Technologies Inc.  The lawsuit represents CSBS’s third challenge to the OCC’s authority

On April 7, 2021, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Winn-Dixie Stores’ websites are not “public accommodations” and therefore are not subject to the accessibility requirements of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”).  The decision reversed a 2017 federal district court opinion – in what may be the only website

The Attorney Generals of the six states and District of Columbia who filed a lawsuit against the FDIC to set aside its “Madden-fix” rule have filed a motion for summary judgment in the case.

The lawsuit is pending before the same California federal district court judge (Judge Jeffrey S. White) who is

The OCC has filed a Statement of Recent Decision in Support of Defendants’ Motion for Summary Judgment in the lawsuit filed by state AGs to enjoin the OCC’s final rule (Rule) purporting to override the Second Circuit’s Madden decision as to national banks and federal savings associations.

The recent decision submitted by the OCC, Robinson

In a very troubling decision of first impression, a unanimous panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit has ruled that a debt collector’s transmittal of the plaintiff’s personal information to the vendor it used to generate and send collection letters “constituted a communication ‘in connection with the collection of any debt’

After looking at how the decision narrows the technology covered by the Telephone Consumer Protection Act’s automatic telephone dialing system definition, we discuss its implications for TCPA litigation going forward, including do-not-call and prerecorded call claims and the intersection with debt collection claims, and for regulatory compliance when making calls for telemarketing or lead generation,

Yesterday, in a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited the reach of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by narrowing what technology qualifies as an Automatic Telephone Dialing System.  In the wake of this development, members of Ballard Spahr’s Consumer Financial Services Group recorded a conversation that breaks down and analyzes what the Court’s