The CFPB has filed its combined cross-motion for summary judgment and opposition to the plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment in the lawsuit filed by industry trade groups challenging the CFPB’s final rule on Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans (the Rule).  The combined motion and opposition follows the filing of an Amended Complaint

The CFPB has released the Summer 2020 edition of its Supervisory Highlights.  The report discusses the Bureau’s examinations in the areas of consumer reporting, debt collection, deposits, fair lending, mortgage servicing, and payday lending that were completed between September 2019 and December 2019.

Key findings are described below.

Consumer reporting.  CFPB examiners found:

On August 28, 2020, the industry trade groups challenging the CFPB’s final Rule on Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans (the Rule) filed their Amended Complaint in accordance with the briefing schedule recently entered by the court.  The Amended Complaint focuses on the payment provisions of the Rule but the trade groups have

The Texas federal district court hearing the lawsuit filed by two trade groups challenging the CFPB’s 2017 final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (2017 Rule) has entered an order lifting the stay of the lawsuit, originally entered in June 2018 on the heels of the trade groups’ motion for a preliminary injunction and before

After we recap the 2017 final rule and its implications for industry, we discuss the CFPB’s actions to eliminate its ability-to-repay provisions but keep its payment provisions, possible use of the Congressional Review Act to restore the entire 2017 rule, status of the Texas litigation challenging the 2017 rule, potential impact of the 2020 presidential

The CFPB and the two trade groups challenging the CFPB’s 2017 final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (2017 Rule) have filed a joint motion asking the Texas federal district court hearing the trade groups’ lawsuit to lift the stay of the lawsuit, originally entered in June 2018 on the heels of the trade group’s motion

The topics we discuss are: implications of the SCOTUS Seila Law decision on CFPB rules, past consent orders, ongoing enforcement, and the Texas lawsuit challenging the CFPB payday loan rule; DOJ/FTC auto dealer fair lending actions, status of disparate impact, and Google targeted advertising changes; the CFPB’s new advisory opinion program; timing of CFPB debt

The CFPB has issued its long-awaited final rule rescinding the ability-to-repay provisions in its final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule).  The final rule will be effective 90 days after its publication in the Federal Register.

The CFPB also issued a document in which it affirmed and ratified the Payday Rule’s payments provisions. 

The Texas federal district court hearing the lawsuit filed by two trade groups challenging the CFPB’s final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule) entered an order yesterday that once again continues the stay of the lawsuit and the August 19, 2019 compliance date for both the Payday Rule’s ability-to-repay (ATR) provisions and its payment

A joint status report was filed this past Friday with the Texas federal district court hearing the lawsuit filed by two trade groups challenging the CFPB’s final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule).

The report states that the Bureau “is continuing to make progress” on its proposed rulemaking to rescind the Payday Rule’s ability-to-repay