Since it was filed in a California federal court in July 2012, we have been following CFPB v. Chance Edward Gordon, a case in which the CFPB alleged that an attorney duped consumers by falsely promising loan modifications in exchange for advance fees and, in reality, did little or nothing to help consumers.  The

It should be no surprise that the CFPB and Republican Congressman Jeb Hensarling, who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, have different perspectives on the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last week that President Obama exceeded his Constitutional recess appointment authority when he filled three vacancies on the National Labor Relations Board in January 2012 . 

Although the controversy over the validity of Richard Cordray’s recess appointment as CFPB Director effectively ended with his confirmation by the Senate this past July, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for documents relating to the appointment were the subject of a decision issued on September 30 by a federal district court in Washington D.C. 

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed today to review the D.C. Circuit’s decision in Noel Canning v. NLRB invalidating President Obama’s January 4, 2012 appointment of three NLRB members.  Because Richard Cordray was appointed CFPB Director on the same day and through the same assertion of “recess” appointment authority as the NLRB members at issue in

We have been following very closely developments in NLRB v. Noel Canning, the case seeking Supreme Court review of the D.C. Circuit Court’s judgment invalidating President Obama’s January 4, 2012 appointment of several NLRB members. This case will likely determine the fate of Richard Cordray, who was appointed as Director of the CFPB on

We recently reported that counsel for the respondent in NLRB v. Noel Canning planned to make a filing advising the U.S. Supreme Court that the respondent did not oppose the NLRB’s petition for certiorari

That filing occurred on May 23, with respondent filing a brief stating that it “does not oppose certiorari because this

The dark cloud that has been hanging over CFPB Director Richard Cordray’s recess appointment just got darker.  In a 2-1 decision in NLRB v. New Vista Nursing and Rehabilitation, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled today that, under the U.S. Constitution’s Recess Appointments Clause (RAC), the President may only make