The U. S. Supreme Court has given the Solicitor General another extension of the date by which the government must file its response to Seila Law’s petition for a writ of certiorari.  The petition seeks review of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling that the CFPB’s single-director-removable-only-for-cause structure is constitutional.  The new extension gives the SG until

Seven amicus briefs have been filed in support of Seila Law’s petition for a writ of certiorari that seeks review of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling that the CFPB’s single-director-removable-only-for-cause structure is constitutional.

The briefs were filed by:

Seila Law has filed a petition for a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking review of the Ninth Circuit’s ruling that the CFPB’s single-director-removable-only-for-cause structure is constitutional.  The petition follows the entry of an order by the Ninth Circuit granting Seila Law’s motion for a stay of the Ninth Circuit’s mandate in

Appellant Seila Law has filed a motion for a stay of the Ninth Circuit’s mandate in its decision ruling that the CFPB’s single-director-removable-only-for-cause structure is constitutional pending the filing by Seila Law of a petition for a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court.  Seila Law has not sought a rehearing en banc by

A unanimous Ninth Circuit panel has ruled in CFPB v. Seila Law LLC that the CFPB’s single-director-removable-only-for-cause structure is constitutional.

Appellant Seila Law had asked the Ninth Circuit to overturn the district court’s refusal to set aside a Bureau civil investigative demand, arguing that the CID was invalid because the CFPB’s structure is unconstitutional.  In