Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last month in Collins v. Yellin (previously captioned Collins v. Mnuchin), controversy quickly erupted over the decision’s implications for the CFPB in three pending cases: All American Check Cashing and the two cases involving the CFPB’s 2017 final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (2017 Rule).

In Collins,

In its decision earlier this week in Collins v. Yellin (previously captioned Collins v. Mnuchin), the U.S. Supreme Court, relying on its decision in Seila Law, held that the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s structure is unconstitutional because the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 only allows the President to remove the

In December 2020,  after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the CFPB’s structure was unconstitutional and remanded the case for further consideration, a unanimous panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that the civil investigative demand (CID) issued to Seila Law was validly ratified by former Director Kraninger and affirmed

Less than six weeks after hearing oral argument, a unanimous panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that the CID issued to Seila Law was validly ratified by Director Kraninger and affirmed the district court’s decision granting the CFPB’s petition to enforce the CID.

After ruling that the CFPB’s

Last week, the CFPB filed its supplemental brief with the Ninth Circuit in Seila Law and its supplemental en banc brief with the Fifth Circuit in All American Check Cashing.  The CFPB argues in both briefs that ratification of its actions by both former Acting Director Mulvaney and Director Kraninger cured any initial constitutional