The plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed by industry groups in a Texas federal district court against the CFPB to overturn the final arbitration rule have filed a Notice of Voluntary Dismissal.

Yesterday, President Trump signed H.J. Res. 111, the joint resolution passed by the House and Senate disapproving the CFPB arbitration rule.  In

Today, President Trump signed H.J. Res. 111, the joint resolution passed by the House and Senate disapproving the CFPB arbitration rule.

The House and Senate actions were taken pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (CRA), which establishes a fast-track procedure under which Congress can override a federal agency’s final rule by passing a resolution of

CFPB Director Richard Cordray yesterday sent a letter to President Trump asking him to uphold the Bureau’s arbitration rule even though the Senate recently joined the House in authorizing a repeal of the rule under the Congressional Review Act.

Director Cordray’s letter states that without the arbitration rule, military service members will “get cheated out

We are pleased to report that the U.S. Senate voted last night, 51 to 50, to override the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s final arbitration rule.  The rule would have prohibited the use of class action waivers in consumer arbitration agreements, among other provisions.

The Senate took action pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (CRA), which

Enough is enough!

I recognize that reasonable minds can differ with respect to whether the Senate should override the CFPB arbitration rule.  However, it is inexcusable when plaintiffs’ lawyers and consumer advocates blatantly distort the impact that the override of the arbitration rule will have on members of the military.

In a recent article urging

In a scathing report released today, the U.S. Department of the Treasury concludes that the CFPB’s final arbitration rule “failed to meaningfully evaluate whether prohibiting mandatory arbitration clauses in consumer financial contracts would serve either consumer protection or the public interest — its two statutory mandates.”  Moreover, according to the report, the arbitration rule will

In an important development in the federal court lawsuit by industry groups seeking to overturn the CFPB’s arbitration rule, the plaintiffs yesterday filed a motion for a preliminary injunction.  The motion requests entry of an order “that (1) enjoins the 180-day implementation period, which commenced on the date the Rule became effective, so that—if the

Since last summer, Acting U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Keith A. Noreika and CFPB Director Richard Cordray have exchanged polar-opposite views on whether the CFPB’s final arbitration rule should be repealed.  Both are seeking to persuade Senators who may still be undecided as the deadline for Congressional Review Act action draws closer.

The debate

As promised previously, here are further details on the lawsuit filed by industry groups against the CFPB to overturn the final arbitration rule.  The complaint largely mirrors our heavy criticism of the rule.  (For example, see here, here and here.)

The complaint asserts four principal arguments:

  1. The rule is the product of  “the