A group of 24 Democratic state attorneys general and the D.C. attorney general have submitted a comment letter to the CFPB setting forth their opposition to the CFPB’s proposal to delay the compliance date for the ability-to-repay (ATR) provisions of its final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule).  They conclude their letter by threatening

The Texas federal district court hearing the lawsuit filed by two trade groups challenging the CFPB’s final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule) entered an order yesterday continuing the stay of the lawsuit and the August 19, 2019 compliance date for both the Rule’s ability-to-repay (ATR) provisions and its payment provisions.  The order directs

The CFPB and the two industry trade groups that filed a lawsuit in a Texas federal district court challenging the CFPB’s final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Payday Rule) filed a new status report with the court on March 8 to follow up on their March 1 status report.

The new status report sets

As we reported previously, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (Act) subjects Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing to Truth in Lending Act (TILA) ability-to-repay (ATR) requirements under rules to be adopted by the CFPB. The CFPB recently issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking to solicit information regarding PACE financing.

The CFPB is proposing to rescind the ability-to-repay provisions of its payday loan rule and delay the provisions’ compliance date while leaving in place the rule’s troublesome payment provisions and their August 19 compliance date.  In this week’s podcast, we look at the CFPB’s rationale for rescinding the ATR provisions, what the payment provisions require

The CFPB’s proposal to revise its final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule to rescind the rule’s ability-to-repay (ATR) provisions in their entirety and its proposal to delay the compliance date for the ATR provisions until November 19, 2020 were published in today’s Federal Register.  The CFPB’s proposals would leave unchanged the rule’s troublesome payment

The CFPB has issued highly-anticipated proposed revisions to its final payday/auto title/high-rate installment loan rule (Rule) that would rescind the Rule’s ability-to-repay provisions in their entirety (which the CFPB refers to as the “Mandatory Underwriting Provisions”).  The Bureau will take comments on the proposal for 90 days after its publication in the Federal Register

After several years of rulemaking, amendments, and delays, the CFPB’s Prepaid Rule (the “Rule”) is finally set to take effect on April 1, 2019.  This rapidly approaching effective date means that prepaid issuers have only two months left to confirm that their prepaid programs and materials are fully compliant with the Rules’ complex and specific

The CFPB published two notices in today’s Federal Register seeking OMB approval for two surveys, one dealing with debt collection and the other with household balance sheets.

Debt collection.  The request described in the notice is a resubmission of a previously published request to OMB seeking approval to conduct an online survey of 8,000