After looking at how the decision narrows the technology covered by the Telephone Consumer Protection Act’s automatic telephone dialing system definition, we discuss its implications for TCPA litigation going forward, including do-not-call and prerecorded call claims and the intersection with debt collection claims, and for regulatory compliance when making calls for telemarketing or lead generation,

Yesterday, in a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited the reach of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by narrowing what technology qualifies as an Automatic Telephone Dialing System.  In the wake of this development, members of Ballard Spahr’s Consumer Financial Services Group recorded a conversation that breaks down and analyzes what the Court’s

Today, in a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court limited the reach of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) by narrowing what technology qualifies as an Automatic Telephone Dialing System (“ATDS”).  Among other restrictions, the TCPA prohibits calls to phone numbers using an ATDS without prior express consent.  The TCPA defines an ATDS as “equipment

Days after missing the opportunity in Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants to limit the improper impact of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act on legitimate businesses, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to tackle the most debated issue in TCPA litigation history.  The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide what qualifies as an

A purported class action filed last week in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, accuses Facebook of discriminating against women and individuals over 40 who were denied advertisements and information about certain financial services opportunities, including those for bank accounts, insurance, and investing.

According to the complaint, Facebook encourages financial

Tomorrow, October 23, the House Committee on Financial Services will hold a hearing entitled “An Examination of Facebook and Its Impact on the Financial Services and Housing Sectors.” The scheduled witness will be Mark Zuckerberg, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Facebook. There will be a live webcast of the hearing.

As indicated in the Committee

Just two days after the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced a historic settlement of privacy and security claims against Equifax, the FTC today announced that Facebook has agreed to pay $5 billion in civil fines, arising from its violation of a 2012 consent order with the FTC.  According to the FTC, this is the largest

Only a few months have passed since the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development filed a charge of discrimination against Facebook, alleging that the ad-targeting techniques used to determine which users would see advertising related to housing and housing-related service (like mortgage loans) were based on protected characteristics and “close proxies” for those

The Department of Housing and Urban Development has issued a “Charge of Discrimination” against Facebook that charges the company “with engaging in discriminatory housing practices in violation of the [provisions of the Fair Housing Act that prohibit discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin or disability.]” HUD’s Charge (which

As a brand-new federal agency, and one whose mission unquestionably involves interaction with the public, the CFPB has fully embraced communication tools like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.  The Bureau has been making “friends” with people at a rate that would make even the most industrious teenagers jealous:  it has been “liked” over 8,800 times on