On June 13, 2024, CFPB Director Rohit Chopra appeared before the House Financial Services Committee for a hearing, “The Semi-Annual Report of the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection.” As we expected, the House Financial Services Committee also tackled the earnings issue raised by Senator John Kennedy (R-LA). We previously blogged that CFPB Director Rohit Chopra was dismissive of the argument that the CFPB was unlawfully funded out of losses of the Federal Reserve Banks.… Continue Reading

It took about an hour for someone on the Senate Finance Committee during its hearing today to mention the “elephant in the room” — namely, the fact that the CFPB is only allowed under Dodd-Frank to be funded out of “combined earnings of the Federal Reserve System” and that there has been no combined earnings of the Federal Reserve System beginning in September, 2022.… Continue Reading

Earlier today, I published a blog post highlighting the flaws in the arguments made by Professor Jeff Sovern in his recent article in the Consumer Law & Policy Blog for why the Fed, notwithstanding its losses, can still lawfully fund the CFPB.  Now, I want to turn to the flaws in Professor Adam Levitin’s blog post published on May 30 in Credit Slips that takes the same position as Jeff.… Continue Reading

As the industry continues to digest the Fifth Circuit’s opinion in Community Financial Services Association of America, Ltd. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which held the Bureau’s funding mechanism to be unconstitutional, new litigation illustrates the challenges that the decision creates to the CFPB’s ability to conduct oversight and enforcement.… Continue Reading

A Utah federal district court has rejected the attempt of The Center for Excellence in Higher Education (CEHE) to invalidate a civil investigative demand (CID) issued by the CFPB based on a challenge to the constitutionality of the CFPB’s funding mechanism. 

Pursuant to Dodd-Frank, the CFPB receives its funding through requests made by the CFPB Director to the Federal Reserve, subject to a cap equal to 12% of the Federal Reserve’s budget, rather than through the Congressional appropriations process. … Continue Reading

H.J. Res. 31, the appropriations bill signed into law by President Trump on February 15 that ended the partial government shutdown and provides funding for fiscal year 2019 through September 30, 2019, includes a provision dealing with CFPB funding requests.

Pursuant to Section 1017(a)(1) of the Dodd-Frank Act, subject to the Act’s funding cap, the Fed is required to transfer to the CFPB on a quarterly basis “the amount determined by the [CFPB] Director to be reasonably necessary to carry out the authorities of the Bureau under Federal consumer financial law, taking into account such other sums made available to the Bureau from the preceding year (or quarter of such year.)” … Continue Reading

Mick Mulvaney, President Trump’s appointee as CFPB Acting Director, has sent a letter to Fed Chair Janet Yellen “to inform [her] that for the Second Quarter of Fiscal Year 2018, the Bureau is requesting $0.” (emphasis included).

Pursuant to Section 1017(a)(1) of the Dodd-Frank Act, subject to the Act’s funding cap, the Fed is required to transfer to the CFPB on a quarterly basis “the amount determined by the [CFPB] Director to be reasonably necessary to carry out the authorities of the Bureau under Federal consumer financial law, taking into account such other sums made available to the Bureau from the preceding year (or quarter of such year.)”… Continue Reading

Republican Senator David Perdue has introduced a bill, S.1383 entitled the ‘‘Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Accountability Act of 2015,” that would make the CFPB subject to the congressional appropriations process.  Currently, pursuant to Dodd-Frank, the CFPB is entitled to receive automatic annual funding through transfers from the Fed that are capped at a fixed percentage of the Fed’s total 2009 operating expenses.… Continue Reading

Yesterday, the House of Representatives, by a vote of 235-183, passed H.R. 1195, titled the “Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Advisory Boards Act.”  As originally proposed, the bill would codify the CFPB’s existing advisory councils for community banks and credit unions (and rename them “advisory boards”) and establish a new Small Business Advisory Board.… Continue Reading