On Monday, the FRB, FDIC, and OCC issued a “Statement on LIBOR Transition” that encourages banks to transition away from the London Inter-Bank Offered Rate (LIBOR) as soon as possible, and in any event by December 31, 2021.    

The agencies indicate that the LIBOR administrator has announced it will consult on its intention

The Biden transition has announced the members of its agency review teams.

The team leaders include the following individuals:

CFPB.  The team will be led by Leandra English, who is currently with the New York Department of Financial Services.  As our blog readers may recall, Ms. English was appointed CFPB Deputy Director by

The Fed, FDIC, and OCC have issued a “Statement on Reference Rates for Loans” that addresses replacement rates for the London Inter-Bank Offered Rate (LIBOR).  LIBOR, which many creditors currently use as the index for calculating the interest rate on credit cards and other variable-rate consumer credit products, is expected to be discontinued

On November 10, the Senate Banking Committee will hold a hearing, “Oversight of Financial Regulators.”

On November 12, the House Financial Services Committee will hold a hearing, “Oversight of Prudential Regulators: Ensuring the Safety, Soundness, Diversity, and Accountability of Depository Institutions during the Pandemic.”

The scheduled witnesses at both hearings are:

The CFPB, OCC, Federal Reserve, FDIC, and NCUA have issued a proposed rule on the role of supervisory guidance.

In September 2018, the agencies issued an “Interagency Statement Clarifying the Role of Supervisory Guidance.”  In response to the Statement, the agencies received a petition requesting a formal rulemaking on the subject.  The proposed

Regulators Provide Greater Transparency into BSA/AML Enforcement Process.  On August 13, 2020, the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, National Credit Union Administration, and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “Agency” or collectively the “Agencies”) issued a joint statement updating and clarifying their 2007 guidance regarding how they evaluate enforcement actions

A recently-released Federal Reserve Board article, “The Cost Structure of Consumer Finance Companies and Its Implications for Interest Rates: Evidence from the Federal Reserve Board’s 2015 Survey of Finance Companies,” provides strong support for industry’s position that interest rate caps can be harmful to consumers by limiting the availability of small dollar loans.

The

The Federal Reserve Board recently issued a Service Announcement setting forth the details of its FedNow Service, a new 24x7x365 interbank settlement service with clearing functionality to support instant payments in the United States.

The Fed announced its decision to develop the FedNow Service in a notice and request for comment issued in August 2019. 

When the OCC issued its final Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) rule on May 20, 2020, the agency acted alone without waiting to achieve consensus with the FDIC, the agency with which the OCC had jointly issued its proposed rule. The FDIC declined to join the OCC’s CRA reform effort, despite seemingly being in lock-step with

Effective April 24, 2020, the Federal Reserve amended Regulation D to remove the six-per-month limit on transfers or withdrawals from the definition of a “savings deposit.”  The amendment is set forth in an interim final rule published in the Federal Register on April 28.  Comments on the interim final rule must be filed by June