On October 25, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit affirmed a district court’s order dismissing a class action alleging that an Illinois internet-based credit union breached its account agreement when it charged non-sufficient funds (NSF) fees to its customers. Plaintiff alleged the account agreement required the credit union to use the ledger-balance

We discuss each of the three categories of risk identified in the guidance (consumer compliance, third-party, and litigation), plaintiffs’ legal theories in class actions challenging NSF fees, the role of arbitration clauses and contract language in defending class actions, the FDIC’s suggested risk mitigation practices, issues to consider in navigating FDIC expectations for remediation of

A New York federal district court has issued an order allowing a putative class action to proceed against Trustco Bank, finding that the plaintiff had stated a claim for breach of contract based on the bank’s assessment of non-sufficient funds (NSF) fees.  The complaint in Jenkins v. Trustco Bank alleges that Trustco’s assessment of multiple

The FDIC has issued new supervisory guidance (FIL-40-2022) on multiple non-sufficient funds (NSF) fees arising from the re-presentment of the same unpaid transaction.  The guidance directly applies only to state-chartered banks and thrifts that are not members of the Federal Reserve System.  National banks and federal thrifts are supervised by the Office of the Comptroller

The Division of Banks of the Massachusetts Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation has issued a supervisory alert to warn financial institutions of the potential legal and regulatory risks arising from NSF fees charged on the representment of unpaid transactions.

The alert addresses the common scenario in which a financial institution charges an NSF

Afterpay, a buy-now, pay-later company, is facing a putative class action lawsuit in a California federal district court. The complaint alleges that Afterpay misled customers in representing that its services allowed customers to “pay for purchases at a later date, with no interest, no fees, and no hassle” when “there are huge, undisclosed fees and