The two lawsuits filed in federal district court in California by state attorneys general challenging the OCC and FDICMadden fix” final rules will both be heard by Judge Jeffrey S. White.  Judge White was appointed to the federal bench in 2002 by President George W. Bush.

When the lawsuits were filed, the lawsuit

Ballard Spahr LLP has submitted a comment letter to the OCC in support of its proposed rule, “National Banks and Federal Savings Associations as Lenders” (the “Proposed Rule”). As detailed in our letter, we applaud the Proposed Rule, which would establish a clear and logical bright line confirming and clarifying that a bank (or

Regulators Provide Greater Transparency into BSA/AML Enforcement Process.  On August 13, 2020, the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, National Credit Union Administration, and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “Agency” or collectively the “Agencies”) issued a joint statement updating and clarifying their 2007 guidance regarding how they evaluate enforcement actions

We have previously blogged about the lawsuits filed by the Colorado Attorney General against fintechs Avant and Marlette Funding and their partner banks WebBank and Cross River Bank.   These lawsuits challenged on Madden and “true lender” grounds the interest rates charged under the defendants’ loan programs. The AG has now settled with the defendants and

The OCC has filed its reply brief with the Second Circuit in its appeal from the district court’s final judgment in the lawsuit filed by the New York Department of Financial Services (DFS) challenging the OCC’s issuance of special purpose national bank (SPNB) charters to non-depository fintech companies.

In May 2019, the district court denied

In an order issued August 12, 2020, the United States District Court for the District of Colorado relied on the OCC’s “Madden fix” rule  to hold that, under Section 27 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. § 1831d, a promissory note with an interest rate that was valid when made remains valid

On July 31, 2020, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) approved the national bank charter application of Varo Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned subsidiary of fintech Varo Money, Inc. The approved application is for a full-service charter, not the OCC’s controversial FinTech charter that is currently the subject of ongoing litigation. In

Acting Comptroller Brooks recently revealed the OCC’s plans to create a national payments charter for payment processing companies.  After discussing the new charter’s intended purpose and benefits, we look at the OCC’s planned two-phase roll-out, how a payments charter would differ from the OCC’s fintech charter, other charter options for non-bank payment processors, and possible

As we reported, Acting Comptroller of the Currency Brian Brooks has previewed the OCC’s plans to introduce another special purpose national bank charter that would give payment companies a nationwide servicing platform and federal preemption of state laws regarding licensing and regulation of money transmitters and payment services providers.  Acting Comptroller Brooks’ statements drew