The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has launched a new online “dashboard” that makes certain data received from active duty servicemembers and veterans publicly available. The data come from the FTC’s Consumer Sentinel Network, which aggregates consumer complaints received directly from consumers, as well as data contributions received from others (including state attorneys general, the CFPB,

A group of 15 Democratic state attorneys general have submitted a letter responding to the CFPB’s request for information seeking comment on potential changes to the CFPB’s practices for the public reporting of consumer complaint information.  (Last month, a group of 35 Democratic U.S. Senators sent a letter to Mick Mulvaney and Leandra English urging

Two weeks ago, we reported on an article published by the American Banker, which alleged certain inaccuracies and flawed practices in the CFPB’s consumer complaint database, citing several current and former employees of the Bureau. This week, CFPB Director Richard Cordray wrote a sharp rebuke of the American Banker’s article, claiming that it was  “riddled

A recent article by the American Banker claims, based on undisclosed CFPB documents and interviews with current and former agency officials, that the CFPB’s consumer complaint database is widely held to be inaccurate and untrustworthy. The article points to what it believes to be egregious instances of duplicative complaints as well as the misidentification of

On Friday, the CFPB announced that it had expanded its public Consumer Complaint Database to include complaints about credit reporting and money transfers. Simultaneously, the CFPB announced that complaints in its public database are searchable by state.

The CFPB uses complaints its receives to prioritize and prepare for investigations and examinations. The public database now

The CFPB’s announcement last Thursday that it had expanded its public Consumer Complaint Database to include complaints about products other than credit cards was accompanied by the release of four items.

One item was a breakdown of the more than 90,000 complaints about credit cards, mortgages, bank deposit products and services, student loans, and other

TransparencyRecall that when the CFPB launched the Consumer Complaint Database, its expressed hope that “the marketplace of ideas” – i.e., the public – would study and analyze the information disclosed in the database in order to “determine what the data show[s].” 77 FR 37559. The CFPB also stated that the purpose of the database