The American Bankers Association jointly with state bankers associations, the American Financial Services Association, and the Mortgage Bankers Association are urging the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to make significant changes to its 2013 Disparate Impact Rule (Rule) in light of the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Texas Department

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) seeking comment on whether its 2013 Disparate Impact Rule (Rule) should be revised in light of the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. 

On July

The National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA) has announced a settlement in its lawsuit against Travelers Indemnity Company in which it alleged that Travelers engaged in discriminatory conduct in violation of the Fair Housing Act (FHA).

In its lawsuit, which was filed in federal district court in Washington, D.C., NFHA alleged that Travelers had a policy

We previously reported on the Executive Order 13772 titled “Core Principles for Regulating the United States Financial System,” which is a high-level policy statement consisting of a series of Core Principles that are designed to inform the manner in which the Administration regulates the financial system.  The Executive Order directs the Secretary of the Treasury

The D.C. district court recently granted two industry trade associations whose members sell homeowners insurance leave to file an amended complaint in their lawsuit challenging the Fair Housing Act (FHA) disparate impact rule (Rule) adopted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).  In their amended complaint, the trade associations allege that the

The American Bankers Association has sent a letter to the DOJ, Fed, OCC, FDIC, HUD and CFPB requesting confirmation “in interagency guidance, updated exam procedures, and where appropriate amended regulations that the Agencies’ consideration of disparate impact claims in both the supervisory and enforcement context will be governed by standards consistent with the [Supreme] Court’s

A sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. on June 25, 2015, holding that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act.

Inclusive Communities does not resolve the question of whether disparate impact claims are cognizable under

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act.  Justice Kennedy wrote the majority opinion in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., in which Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayer and Kagan joined.  Justice Alito wrote a dissenting opinion, in

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument last week in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.— the case presenting the issue of whether disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act (FHA).  Two prior cases presenting this issue were settled after merits briefing but before