A divided panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit has ruled in Walker v. BOKF, National Association that the extended overdraft fees charged by BOKF were not “interest” under the National Bank Act (NBA).  The Tenth Circuit’s ruling on what it called “an issue of first impression in this circuit” follows

On December 31, 2021, New York Governor Hochul signed into law S5724-A which reduces the annual rate of interest on judgments arising out of a consumer debt where the defendant is a natural person from 9% to 2%.  The laws take effect 120 days from the Governor’s signature, which is April 30, 2022.

For purposes

The FDIC has filed a motion for summary judgment in the lawsuit filed by the Attorney Generals of six states and District of Columbia to set aside the FDIC’s “Madden-fix” rule.  The filing also includes the FDIC’s opposition to the summary judgment motion filed by the AGs.

The lawsuit is pending before

The FDIC has issued its widely anticipated final rule resolving the uncertainty caused by the Second Circuit’s Madden v. Midland Funding decision.  Madden held that a non-bank entity that purchased charged-off loans from a national bank could not charge the same rate of interest on the loans as the national bank was able to charge

Last week, California Governor Newsom signed into law AB 539, which makes significant amendments to the California Financing Law (CFL), and SB 616, which creates a new exemption from levy for deposit account funds.

The Governor signed AB 539 on October 10.  Most importantly, the CFL amendments limit the rate of interest that

Senator Bernie Sanders recently announced that he will be introducing a bill, the “Loan Shark Prevention Act,” that would amend the Truth in Lending Act (15 U.S.C. 1606) (TILA) to establish a “national consumer credit usury rate” that would limit the APR “applicable to any extension of credit” to the lesser of “15 percent