Last week, the CFPB finalized its proposed revisions to its trial disclosures and no-action letter policies and also finalized its proposal to create a new FinTech sandbox policy.  It also announced the creation of the American Financial Innovation Network (ACFIN), a network of federal and state regulators to facilitate innovation, and issued its first no-action

In its first No-Action Letter under the new revised policy, the CFPB addresses a long-standing issue under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act regarding certain payment arrangements between mortgage lenders and housing counseling agencies.  We previously reported on the CFPB issuing its final No-Action Letter policy and other innovation policies.  (The CFPB issued just one

On September 14, 2017, the CFPB issued a no-action letter – the first one ever issued by the agency – to a marketplace lender, stating that the agency had no present intention to take enforcement or supervisory action against the lender under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) relating to the lender’s underwriting model, and

Ballard Spahr to conduct webinar on March 24, 2016 entitled “CFPB Regulatory Certainty or Uncertainty? Consent Orders, Informal Guidance, and the New No-Action Letter Policy” Register here

The CFPB has issued a final policy statement on issuing “no-action” letters (NAL) for innovative financial products or services.  The CFPB’s statement that the final policy was

The American Bankers Association, American Bankers Insurance Association and Consumers Banking Association have submitted a joint comment letter on the CFPB’s proposed policy on issuing “no-action” letters for innovative financial products or services.

The trade groups expressed the overall concern that the proposal will not “serve as a viable approach to alleviating regulatory uncertainty” because

The CFPB published for comment in today’s Federal Register a proposed policy on issuing “no-action” letters for innovative financial products or services.  Like those issued by the SEC and CFTC, the no-action letters would communicate that, subject to specific facts and circumstances, CFPB staff has no present intention to recommend initiation of an enforcement or