A federal district court judge in the Southern District of New York ruled late last week that three credit unions had successfully established a likelihood of success on their claims that the retroactive application of New York’s recently-passed rate reduction law constitutes a regulatory taking in violation of the U.S. Constitution and preliminarily enjoined state

Three credit unions have filed a federal class action lawsuit in the Southern District of New York seeking to halt the enforcement or implementation of New York’s recently passed S.B. 5724A which would retroactively and prospectively lower the statutory annual interest rate on  consumer debt judgments from 9% to 2%.  The credit unions allege that

A recently-released Federal Reserve Board article, “The Cost Structure of Consumer Finance Companies and Its Implications for Interest Rates: Evidence from the Federal Reserve Board’s 2015 Survey of Finance Companies,” provides strong support for industry’s position that interest rate caps can be harmful to consumers by limiting the availability of small dollar loans.

The

There was movement last week on two California bills that we have been tracking closely and which could substantially alter the lending and brokering landscape under the California Financing Law (“CFL”).

On July 9th, AB-539, which proposes to cap interest rates at 36% plus the federal funds rate on CFL loans of $2,500 to

AB 539 was cleared by the California Senate’s Banking Committee on June 26.  The bill would change several aspects of the California Financing Law (CFL), including by setting new interest rate caps, imposing new rules governing loan duration, and prohibiting prepayment penalties.  For example, while the CFL does not set a maximum interest rate on

Last week, Senator Dick Durbin, D-Ill., reintroduced a bill, the “Protecting Consumers From Unreasonable Credit Rates Act of 2019,” that would create a national interest-rate cap of 36% on consumer loans. The legislation would make all open-end and closed-end consumer credit transactions, including mortgages, car loans, and payday loans, subject to a 36% APR