AB 539 was cleared by the California Senate’s Banking Committee on June 26.  The bill would change several aspects of the California Financing Law (CFL), including by setting new interest rate caps, imposing new rules governing loan duration, and prohibiting prepayment penalties.  For example, while the CFL does not set a maximum interest rate on

Last week, Senator Dick Durbin, D-Ill., reintroduced a bill, the “Protecting Consumers From Unreasonable Credit Rates Act of 2019,” that would create a national interest-rate cap of 36% on consumer loans. The legislation would make all open-end and closed-end consumer credit transactions, including mortgages, car loans, and payday loans, subject to a 36% APR