In addition to rescinding seven policy statements providing flexibility to companies in meeting certain compliance obligations during the pandemic, the CFPB has also rescinded its 2018 bulletin (2018-01) that announced changes to supervisory communications.  The Bureau has replaced the 2018 bulletin with a new bulletin (2021-01).

In the 2018 bulletin, the Bureau announced that it

The CFPB has issued “Supervisory Highlights COVID-19 Prioritized Assessments Special Edition.”

The report indicates that in May 2020, the Bureau rescheduled about half of its planned examinations and instead conducted prioritized assessments (PAs) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Bureau describes PAs as “higher-level inquiries than traditional examinations [that are] designed to

We review the following findings and discuss their compliance implications: FCRA violations based on obtaining credit reports without a permissible purpose, incorrectly reporting the date of first delinquency, failing to conduct reasonable dispute investigations; Reg. E violations based on waivers of consumers’ dispute rights, use of incorrect date to determine timeliness of error notices, providing

We review the CFPB’s findings that lenders engaged in deceptive practices and violated Regulation Z advertising requirements based on the following conduct and discuss the findings’ compliance implications: false representations about consumers’ ability to apply for loans online and the absence of credit checks; false threats in collection letters about lien placement, asset seizure, and

Mortgage origination and servicing continue to be a CFPB supervisory focus.  We review the CFPB’s findings involving the following areas and discuss the findings’ compliance implications: redlining based on nonbank lenders’ advertising practices, improper consideration of applicants’ public assistance income in determining eligibility for mortgage modifications, and violations of servicing requirements relating to providing periodic

The CFPB has released the Summer 2020 edition of its Supervisory Highlights.  The report discusses the Bureau’s examinations in the areas of consumer reporting, debt collection, deposits, fair lending, mortgage servicing, and payday lending that were completed between September 2019 and December 2019.

Key findings are described below.

Consumer reporting.  CFPB examiners found:

We look at the CFPB’s key findings related to payday lending and mortgage servicing, discuss their implications for the CFPB’s approach to supervision and enforcement, and share practical takeaways for lenders and servicers, including how the CFPB’s findings related to loss mitigation requirements might be used by servicers to inform how they approach disruptions arising

The CFPB’s newly-released Summer 2018 edition of Supervisory Highlights represents the CFPB’s first Supervisory Highlights report covering supervisory activities conducted under Acting Director Mick Mulvaney’s leadership.  The Bureau’s most recent prior Supervisory Highlights report was its Summer 2017 edition, which was issued in September 2017.

On October 10, 2018, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

The CFPB has apparently decided to put its monthly complaint reports on hold.

The CFPB’s last monthly complaint report was its October 2017 report, a “special edition” report that provided data on servicemember complaints on a nationwide and state-by-state basis.  (This “special edition” report, like other CFPB “special edition” monthly complaint reports, departed from

The CFPB’s newly-released Spring 2017 edition of Supervisory Highlights covers supervisory activities generally completed between September and December 2016.  The report indicates that  supervisory resolutions resulted in restitution payments of approximately $6.1 million to more than 16,000 consumers and notes that “[r]ecent non-public resolutions were reached in several auto finance origination matters.”  It also indicates