The CFPB has issued a final rule amending its remittance rule.  The final rule is effective July 21, 2020.

The key amendments consist of the following:

  • Safe harbor threshold.  Currently, the rule’s safe harbor threshold removes from the rule’s coverage an entity that provided 100 or fewer remittance transfers in the previous calendar year and

The CFPB has issued a policy statement regarding its approach to supervision and enforcement of remittance transfers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The EFTA, as implemented by the CFPB’s remittance rule, provides insured depository institutions with a temporary exception that allows them, under certain conditions, to disclose estimates of the exchange rate and covered third-party fees

The CFPB has entered into a settlement to resolve the lawsuit filed against it in May 2019 seeking a declaration that the CFPB’s failure to issue regulations implementing Section 1071 of the Dodd-Frank Act violates the Administrative Procedure Act and an order requiring the Bureau to promptly issue such regulations.  The plaintiffs in the lawsuit,

The CFPB has proposed several amendments to its remittance rule.  Comments on the proposal must be filed no later than January 21, 2020.

The proposed amendments are:

  • An increase in the rule’s safe harbor threshold that currently removes from the rule’s coverage an entity that provided 100 or fewer remittance transfers in the previous calendar

Earlier this week, the CFPB announced a consent order with Maxitransfers Corporation, a remittance transfer provider that allows consumers to electronically transfer funds to people or companies in foreign countries. As the Bureau noted in its press release announcing the settlement, this is the Bureau’s first enforcement action based on violations of the Remittance Transfer

The CFPB has published a notice and request for comments seeking information to inform its consideration of possible changes to its rule on remittance transfers.  Comments are due by June 28, 2019.

The RFI sets forth a series of questions related to the following topics:

  • Expiration of the temporary exception. The EFTA provides a temporary

The CFPB’s Winter 2019 Supervisory Highlights discusses the Bureau’s examination findings in the areas of automobile loan servicing, deposits, mortgage loan servicing, and remittances.  We discussed the Bureau’s auto loan servicing findings in a separate blog post.  In this blog post, we focus on the Bureau’s additional findings.

Although issued under Director Kraninger’s leadership,

The CFPB has issued its September 2016 complaint report which highlights complaints about money transfers and complaints from consumers in Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia metro area.  The CFPB began taking money transfer complaints in April 2013.

General findings include the following:

  • As of September 1, 2016, the CFPB handled approximately 982,400 complaints nationally, including approximately