As part of the CFPB’s crusade against junk fees, CFPB Director, Rohit Chopra addressed credit report fees in prepared remarks at the Mortgage Bankers Association’s Secondary & Capital Markets Conference & Expo 2024. While Director Chopra began his remarks by commenting on the increasing cost of mortgage loan transactions, stating that both consumers and lenders are negatively affected, he focused most of his remarks on the increasing costs of obtaining consumer credit reports.… Continue Reading

In Mortgagee Letter 2024-10, FHA announced a requirement for FHA approved lenders to notify the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of Significant Cybersecurity Incidents. The Mortgagee Letter, which is dated May 23, 2024, provides that the requirement is effective immediately.

For purposes of the reporting requirement, a Significant Cybersecurity Incident (Cyber Incident) is “an event that actually or potentially jeopardizes, without lawful authority, the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of information or an information system; or constitutes a violation or imminent threat of violation of security policies, security procedures, or acceptable use policies and has the potential to directly or indirectly impact the FHA-approved mortgagee’s ability to meet its obligations under applicable FHA program requirements.”… Continue Reading

The result of the CFPB’s multi-year study of the BNPL industry is what the CFPB calls an interpretive rule in which it finds that: (1) “digital user accounts” (each a “DUA”) that may be used to access credit are “credit cards” under Regulation Z; (2) the lenders that issue such accounts are “card issuers;” and (3) that as it relates to traditional BNPL loans (loans that are payable in four or fewer installments with no finance charge) these card issuers are “creditors” subject to subpart B of Regulation Z—the provisions typically applicable to open-end credit.… Continue Reading

Our special guests are Professor Dru Stevenson, South Texas College of Law in Houston, and Brian Knight, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center at George Mason University.  In this episode, we first discuss the history of  “Operation Chokepoint,” the Obama-era initiative in which the FDIC and other federal banking agencies targeted banks serving payday lenders and companies engaged in other “disfavored” industries. … Continue Reading

On May 16, Justice Thomas issued the majority opinion in which the Supreme Court held, by a 7-2 vote, that the CFPB’s funding mechanism comported with the Appropriations Clause of the Constitution which states, in relevant part, in Article I, Section 9, Clause 7:

“No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law…”

Specifically, Justice Thomas held:

“Under the Appropriations Clause, an appropriation is simply a law that authorizes expenditures from a specified source of public money for designated purposes.… Continue Reading

Minnesota becomes the latest state to move to pass legislation regulating the processing and controlling of personal data (HF 4757 / SF 4782). If signed into law by Governor Tim Walz, the Minnesota Consumer Data Privacy Act, or MCDPA, would go into effect on July 31, 2025 and provide various consumer data privacy rights and impose obligations on entities that control or process Minnesota residents’ personal data.… Continue Reading

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last week in CFSA v. CFPB that the CFPB’s funding mechanism does not violate the Appropriations Clause of the U.S. Constitution removes what many observers consider to be the last remaining existential threat to the agency.  The ruling will have a broad impact on the CFPB’s activities. … Continue Reading

On May 16, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Community Financial Services Association of America Ltd. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that the CFPB’s funding mechanism does not violate the Appropriations Clause of the U.S. Constitution.  The Supreme Court’s decision has far-ranging implications, most immediately for cases involving challenges to CFPB regulations or other CFPB actions. … Continue Reading

On May 14, 2024, the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) filed its brief in opposition to Petitioners’ Brief in the legal challenge to the Combating Auto Retail Scams Rule (“CARS Rule”). The petitioners are the National Automobile Dealers Association and Texas Automobile Dealers Association (collectively, “NADA”). In its opposition, the FTC addresses NADA’s three main arguments, namely that the FTC: (1) unlawfully issued the CARS Rule without the required advance notice of proposed rulemaking (“ANPR”), (2) failed to articulate a rational connection between its factual findings and its decision to impose a far-reaching, industry-wide rule, and (3) unreasonably and arbitrarily evaluated the benefits and costs of the CARS Rule.… Continue Reading

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has issued two letters in support of state efforts to prohibit medical debt reporting. In March 2024, CFPB Director Rohit Chopra sent a letter to the California State Senate in support of Senate Bill 1061, which would prohibit the practice of including medical bills on credit reports.… Continue Reading